Teens often want to work, but it isn't easy for them to find jobs that are age-appropriate and that won't have a negative impact on their school work. Teens who work can gain a sense of independence and financial responsibility. That is one of the things that parents can help with as their teen goes through adolescence.

Teens who want to babysit should be aware of the responsibilities involved in taking care of small children, and the patience they will need. They will need to prove that they are dependable and will keep the child safe. Some communities offer babysitting courses, so that teens can learn skills and gain confidence. Discuss the limitations of time and days, so that babysitting won't interfere with schoolwork or other activities.

Babysitting jobs are usually unadvertised; they go by word of mouth. Teens can start the search by asking neighbors and the families with small children at the local school or community center. You can help your teen by networking; ask your friends and colleagues if they are looking for a babysitter. It's better that your teen babysit for people you know or that you have heard of from someone you trust. Suggest that your teen advertise on local Websites or put up flyers in the neighborhood, in stores and the community center, but caution your teen against posting personal information like full name and address. Teens should talk to the parents of the children they may babysit for before starting, to make sure they understand what the parents expect and what the responsibilities are. Help your teen by encouraging them to trust their instincts, and to not take babysitting jobs where they feel uncomfortable for any reason. Babysitting is good experience, but personal safety comes first.