What type of makeup is good for your skin?


Selecting the Right Makeup for Dry, Oily or Combination Skin

Focus first on the right foundation since it's the basis for your makeup. Selecting the best product is directly tied to skin type, so let's discuss what works for the different categories.

For dry skin:

  • Choose liquid foundations with labels highlighting "luminous wear" or "hydrating." These usually typically contain light-reflecting elements that make your skin shine.
  • Avoid mineral powders, matte finishes or cream to powder foundations. These often accentuate problem areas like dry spots and flaky patches. Apply foundation primer first to help makeup go on smoothly. Makeup brushes help spread your foundation evenly so it won't cake up in dry areas.
  • If you prefer to finish with a powder, just powder your nose which is typically the oilier section.
  • Finish your look with a sweep of cream eye shadow, a moisturizing lip gloss or satin lipstick and a touch of cream blush.

For oily skin:

  • Women with oily skin sometimes struggle with blemishes so how do you get the coverage of a liquid without the shine? Matte foundations were made for you! Look for products that say "oil-free" or boast mattifying effects. Use foundation with a pressed or loose powder which you can also buy in mattifying or oil-free formulas.
  • Mineral powder makeup is excellent for oily skin because it actually blots excess oil, giving you a less shiny look. One complaint about mineral makeup is it doesn't cover and conceal well, so if you have acne, spot-treat with concealer.
  • Setting sprays help your makeup last longer, a common challenge for oily complexions. Blotting tissues and shine-free or oil-control powder are also good.
  • Avoid any products with shimmery or glittery ingredients; on oily skin, these just add shine.
  • Waterproof eye liner and a mineral, loose powder eye shadow, paired with a powder blush help prevent makeup runs.

For combination skin:

  • Look for cream to powder or liquid to powder options. These products go on like a liquid but have a matte finish. You typically don't need to use additional powder afterwards which helps dry areas.
  • Mineral or powder foundations can also work. Use a brush to lightly dust over your dry spots, but work it well into the oily spots to control shine.
  • Look for oil-free products and brands that say combination skin on the bottle; your skin should get its oil from a good moisturizer, not your makeup.
  • For a combination complexion, you have cream and powder options for eyes and cheeks depending on where you're oily or dry. A good sales associate can recommend the right product mix.

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