5 Tips for Planning Career Fair Events


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Decide Whether to Go Targeted or Wide
Here's an unusual targeted job fair: 11 adult entertainment clubs in San Francisco held a job fair to hire staff, ranging from bartender and cashiers to exotic dancers and waitresses. Hundreds of applicants showed up.
Here's an unusual targeted job fair: 11 adult entertainment clubs in San Francisco held a job fair to hire staff, ranging from bartender and cashiers to exotic dancers and waitresses. Hundreds of applicants showed up.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Based on the location and scope of your job fair, you should have a sense of the kind of audience who will be interested in attending. Determine the educational background and job experiences that the majority of potential employees in attendance will share. Once you’ve figured out who is most likely to attend, you’ll be able to invite employers, speakers, and exhibitors accordingly.

For example, if you’re hosting a career fair on a college campus, your audience will likely be first-time job seekers who will be graduating with an associate’s or bachelor’s degree. Invite employers who have positions available for employees with little or no professional experience.

Or your research might show there is a need for nursing staff in your community and so you decide to make it a targeted fair. In a targeted job fair, all the companies represented will be looking for candidates with specialized skill sets in a certain industry. Health care and technology fairs are common examples.

Finally, you could host a general job fair and seek out companies hiring in all kinds of fields like academia, finance, the military, retail, health care and education so that job seekers can cast their nets as widely as possible.

In addition to inviting a diverse group of potential employers, consider hosting representatives from schools and vocational and training programs. Many of these programs can serve as feeders into lucrative jobs in a variety of industries.

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