How to Create Home Fragrances Using Household Ingredients


Using Flowers and Plants to Create Home Fragrances

Flowers and plants add beauty to any home, but they can also add a pleasant scent to the air if you choose the right ones. These days, the extensive breeding of flowers has caused some of them to lose their fragrance. In fact, some flowers are bred purposely without fragrance in order to enhance other features [source: Stewart]. But you can still find plenty of flowers and plants that will release their magic into your home environment. Try to catch a whiff before you make a purchase to ensure you actually like the fragrance of common fragrant flowers, like the rose, lily, magnolia, lilac or peony [sources: Midler, Bond Totten].

Houseplants need to have flowers in order to produce fragrance. You can have multiple scents at different times of the year if you choose plants that will flower in different seasons. Not all varieties of plants will have scents, such as orchids [source: Orchids by Hausermann]. You will need to ask the seller if that particular plant will produce the fragrance you are looking for.

Some common fragrant plants include freesia, hyacinth, hoya, jasmine, gardenia, primrose and narcissus [source: Martha Stewart].

Be sure to read up about the plants and flowers of your choice to ensure you are giving them proper care (watering, fertilizer, light and air movement). With proper care and feeding, these plants will last for many years to come.

Now that you know how to freshen up your home using household ingredients, you'll never have to worry about your home's odor. You'll already know that your home smells wonderful.

To learn more, visit the links below.

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Sources

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