Our star gazing project will put a twinkle in your eye!
Our star gazing project will put a twinkle in your eye!
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

These nature projects for kids are ideal for children who enjoy the "Great Outdoors." Kids love to be outside, so why not peak their interest even more by introducing these nature-inspired activities? They are easy to do and kids can work on them together if they wish.

The purpose of these nature projects is to develop an appreciation for our environment. Conservation can only truly take place once we have recognized the natural beauty and wonder that surrounds us.

So why not get started on these nature projects for kids as soon as possible, and cultivate an understanding of the environment that will last a lifetime.

Yards of Helpfulness

Try this yards of helpfulness project and help a neighbor in need with their yard work. They will remember your charity forever.

Star Story Project

Have you got stars in your eyes? If so, try this star story project and write an adventure that involves the stars.

Flower Story Project

Flowers are an interesting topic for a story, so why not try our flower story project and see what interesting ideas bloom from your mind.

Creek Discovery Project

Try our creek discovery project and learn everything there is to know about creeks and streams.

Recycling Project

Help keep our environment clean and green by participating in our recycling project. Get your neighbors involved as well.

Voice Your Opinion Project

Do you have some concerns about our environment and other important issues? Try this voice your opinion project and let your representatives know about your concerns.

Night Sky Project

Try our night sky project and get ready for the greatest light show on earth!

Star Gazing Project

Try our star gazing project and learn how to spot the Big Dipper, the Little Dipper and many other fascinating constellations.

Camp-Out Project

Get closer to nature, and your family, with our camp-out project. We guarantee you'll have a lot of fun!

Nature Wall Hanging Project

Keep a memento of your hikes into the woods with our nature wall hanging project.

Egg Roll Activity

Try our egg roll activity and see if you can cross the finish line first. This is a great activity for large groups of friends and family.

Or, you can jump right in and start with our yards of helpfulness project on the next page.

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Yards of Helpfulness Project for Kids

Help to clean up a neighbor's yard.
Help to clean up a neighbor's yard.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

Try this yards of helpfulness project for kids and help good feelings grow by cleaning up a neighbor's yard.

What You'll Need:

  • Lawn mower
  • Rake
  • Weed trimmer
  • Work gloves
  • Trash bags
  • Ice water

Is your neighbor disabled? Overworked? Sick? Ask if you can help by taking care of some of the yard work. Once they say it's okay, why not mow the lawn? Rake the leaves? Pull those ugly weeds?

Not good with yard tools? Volunteer to babysit your neighbor's children as they do the difficult work. Offer to wash their dishes to free up a little extra time. Do what you can to grow some neighborly smiles and prove you care.

Don't forget to bring a big bottle of ice water with you when you volunteer; yard clean-up can be hot and thirsty work.

Continue reading to find out about our star story project next in nature projects for kids.

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Star Story Project for Kids

Try this star story project for kids and wish upon a star. In ancient times, people all over the world made up stories to explain what the stars are or where they came from.

Some cultures even believed that when people died, they became stars.

What You'll Need:

  • Paper
  • Pen
  • Markers

In ancient times, people all over the world made up stories to explain what the stars are or where they came from. Some people believed that when people died, they became stars.

If you didn't know that stars were giant balls of flaming gas millions of miles away, what would you think? Be creative, and make up a story to explain the stars.

What are they? Why are there so many of them? Why do they twinkle? Make an illustrated story book that tells your "star story." And don't forget to give your story a title!

Get in touch with nature with our flower story project on the next page of nature projects for kids. It's perfect for young writers and nature lovers.

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Flower Story Project for Kids

Write a fun flower story!
Write a fun flower story!
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

Try this flower story project and see how flowers are a wonderful source of material for story writing. They're fun, they're colorful and the possibilities are endless.

What You'll Need:

  • Field guide to plants
  • Notebook
  • Pen
  • Crayons (optional)

Go exploring and observe all the different types of flowers you see in your neighborhood. The field guide can help you identify the different plants you find in nature.

Remember to only go exploring during daylight and stay in a familiar area. Bring a notebook along, a pencil and maybe some crayons so you can get the colors right.

After you've done this "research," you're ready to start writing. Write a story, creating a world where only flowers exist.

Make up flower people, flower buildings, anything you want. You can even draw pictures to go along with the story.

Just have fun and be creative!

Continue reading to learn more about our creek discovery project next in nature projects for kids. After you are finished, you'll know so much that you will have PhD in Creek Studies!

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Creek Discovery Project for Kids

Try this creek discovery project for kids and learn a lot about a creek or stream -- if you know where to look! If there is a creek or stream near where you live, spend some time walking along its banks.

If the water is deep, have an adult go along with you. Pay close attention to the different kinds of plants and animals that live in the water and on the banks. Look closely at the current. Is it the same everywhere, or is it faster in some places and slower in others?

Can you think of reasons for the differences? (For one thing, the current is swifter where the water is shallow, and slower where the water is deep.) What about the surface of the water?

Is it smooth in some places and choppy in others? A small area of choppy water might mean there is a rock or large log just under the surface. Is the water level in the creek higher or lower than normal?

You can tell by looking at the banks. If there is bare, damp soil along the banks, the creek is lower than normal. If you see green land plants or trees growing out of the water, the creek is higher than normal.

Can you tell why the creek flows where it does? Does it go around obstacles, such as large rocks?

Help save the environment with our recycling project on the next page of nature projects for kids. Keep reading to find out more.

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Recycling Project for Kids

Make sure to put objects in the proper box.
Make sure to put objects in the proper box.
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

If you and your family aren't recycling yet, now is the time to start! Try this recycling project for kids (and families) and set up your own recycling center.

What You'll Need:

  • Cardboard boxes
  • Marker

Recycling is one of the best things you can do for nature -- and for people. Recycling saves trees, energy and many other resources that we all need. And recycling helps reduce the amount of pollution and trash in the world.

To start your own recycling center, find out what items can be recycled in your area. (Call city hall or your local newspaper.) Then find out where items to be recycled can be dropped off -- or if they can be picked up at your home.

It's easy to set up a center at your home so everybody will remember to recycle. Simply put cardboard boxes next to the trash can, and label them: "Newspapers," "Aluminum Cans" and "Glass Containers."

These are the items that are most commonly recyclable. In some areas, you can also recycle some kinds of plastic.

Speak your mind about the environment and other concerns you may have with our voice your opinion project. Find out more on the next page of nature projects for kids.

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Voice Your Opinion Project for Kids

Try this voice your opinion project for kids and speak your mind about an environmental project that you really care about.

Are you concerned about stray animals? Air pollution? The destruction of the rain forest? No matter where you live, you have people who represent you in government.

What You'll Need:

  • Stationery
  • Pen
  • Envelope
  • Stamp

Each area of the United States has two senators and at least one congressional representative. The job of these people is to listen to the people in their area, and try to do something about their problems and concerns.

So, why not write them a letter and tell them what's on your mind! Be as specific as you can about what's bothering you. Tell them what you're doing to help and what you'd like them to do.

Maybe they could try to get new laws passed to take better care of nature. You can even write to the President of the United States! After all, he's your leader, too.

Another way to make your voice heard is to write a letter to the editor of your local newspaper. Every newspaper has a page where it prints letters from readers.

Many people read these letters, so it's a chance to tell a lot of people how you feel. Here are the addresses of your government officials:

(Your U.S. Senator's Name)

U.S. Senate

Washington, DC 20510

(Your U.S. Representative's Name)

U.S. House of Representatives

Washington, DC 20515

(President's Name)

The White House

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue

Washington, DC 20500

Continue reading to find out more about our night sky project, and get ready for the greatest show on earth, next in nature projects for kids!

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Night Sky Project for Kids

Get ready for the greatest light show on earth!
Get ready for the greatest light show on earth!
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

Try this night sky project for kids and see the light show that nature puts on every evening.

You've probably seen a few spectacular sunrises and sunsets, but have you ever watched the whole sky to see how the colors change as the sun goes down?

What You'll Need:

  • Notepad and pencil
  • Watercolors or colored pencils
  • Watch

On a clear evening, find a place to sit where you can watch the eastern and western horizons. Use watercolors or colored pencils to record the night sky one hour before sunset.

What you should see in the east is white light near the horizon, pale blue just above it, and blue in the bowl of the sky. The western sky will look warmer than the eastern sky.

Twenty minutes before sunset, you may see pale orange at the eastern horizon, white above that, and shades of blue above that. The western sky will be full of yellows, oranges and pinks.

As the sun sets, look east to see dark blue at the horizon, brilliant shades of red, orange or purple at the level of the setting sun's rays, and pale yellow and deep blue high above. The western sky should glow orange.

If you look carefully, you might see a rare flash of green light just as the sun disappears below the horizon. Just after sunset, the western horizon will be bright and warm with pink bands fading into purple.

In the east, you'll see dark blue at the horizon, purple above that, and red in the bowl of the sky. Twenty minutes after sunset, the western horizon may still be yellow or orange, but above is a band of rosy pink fading into purple.

The eastern horizon is turning dark purple, with blue above that and purple or red in the bowl of the sky. If there is a lot of smoke or dust in the air, the colors may be different. Heavy pollution can produce spectacular orange and red sunsets.

Continue reading to find our more about our stargazing project next in nature projects for kids. After you are finished you'll be able to spot the major constellations in no time at all!

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Star Gazing Project for Kids

Which constellations will you see?
Which constellations will you see?
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

Try this star gazing project for kids if you've got stars in your eyes. There are billions of stars shining in the sky, and they're millions of miles from earth.

You can't see all of them, but with a good stargazing guide from the library and an eye on the sky, you can pick out some familiar star groups and find some new ones as well!

Get an easy guide that shows pictures of the star groups, which are called constellations. You've heard of some of them, such as the Big Dipper, the Little Dipper and the mighty hunter Orion.

Go outside on a clear, dark night when there is no moon. (It's easier to spot the constellations when house lights, streetlights and moonlight aren't blocking out the fainter stars!)

Spread a blanket on the ground. Lie on your back, and look up. Before you look for shapes and constellations, just let your eyes get a good look at the billions of stars that seem to go on forever.

Refer to the stargazing guidebook, and start looking for star groups you recognize from pictures in the book. You might want to start with one of the easiest groups to spot -- the Big Dipper. From there you can find the Little Dipper.

At the end of the curved handle on the Little Dipper is Polaris, the North Star. The North Star is almost exactly above the north pole of the earth. If you can find the North Star, you will always be able to tell which way is north!

In addition to finding stars in the sky, you can also find other planets. If you go out just after sunset, you may be able to find Venus, which is a very bright light in the sky.

To find Mars, look for a steady, reddish light. The planet Jupiter is much whiter than stars and does not twinkle, and Saturn has a yellow light. Look for "stars" that move.

Don't be surprised to find out that the star you see moving across the sky is really a plane or a satellite!

Get closer to you family by trying our camp-out project on the next page of nature projects for kids. Continue reading to find out more.

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Camp-Out Project for Kids

Camping with family is so much fun!
Camping with family is so much fun!
©2007 Publications International, Ltd.

If the great outdoors sounds like a great destination to you, this camp-out project for kids is a sure winner for you and your family.

Sleeping under the stars, roasting hot dogs and marshmallows over an open campfire and singing campfire songs is just as much fun at home as it is away.

To Prepare:

Pack for your camp-out project "trip" as though you really were leaving home. Have each camper bring a backpack and a sleeping bag. Pack a toiletry kit, appropriate clothes to sleep in, and clothes to change into in the morning.

To keep the camping experience more real, try to use the house as little as possible. If you have one, set up a tent in the backyard.

Pack food and drinks in a cooler or ice chest. Bring cooking and eating utensils for each meal you plan to eat outside. To eliminate dish washing, use disposable paper plates and cups and bring a garbage bag to put them in.

If your area allows it, consider building a real campfire if a member of the family would enjoy showing off his or her scouting skills. You could also fire up the old kettle grill.

Suggestions for supper include hot dogs and buns or ready-made sandwiches, chips, fresh fruit, drinks and marshmallows for toasting. For breakfast you might bring juice boxes, muffins or donuts. Bring bottled water for drinking and brushing teeth!

Pack activity extras, such as flashlights and extra batteries, roasting sticks and a book to share and read aloud. Don't forget the music: a guitar, harmonica or other musical instrument is extra fun!

Set up your campsite. Choose smooth and level ground on which to pitch your tent or to spread out your sleeping bags. Spread a large tarp on the ground under the sleeping bags to keep the dampness and bugs out.

Keep a record of your hikes into forests with our nature wall hanging project. Find out more on the next page of nature projects for kids.

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Nature Wall Hanging Project for Kids

You'll remember your next nature trip long after it's over when you try this nature wall hanging project for kids.

What You'll Need:

  • Small objects from nature
  • Jute twine
  • Four sticks or twigs
  • Craft glue
  • Wire or small hooks

When you go on a nature hike, collect small objects such as twigs, grasses, flowers, nuts, bark and shells. When you get home, you can weave all the objects together to make an artistic record of your trip.

First, make a frame for your artwork. Tie together four twigs or sticks to make a square or rectangle. Next wrap natural jute twine around the frame. Use the twine as a base on which to mount all the other objects.

You can weave them through the twine, use small hooks or pieces of wire to hook them on, or glue them on. You could attach the objects to the frame in the order you found them or in an artistic design.

Either way, you'll have a unique "diary" of your trip.

Continue reading about our egg roll activity on the next page of nature projects for kids. Find out more about this fun group activity.

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Egg Roll Activity for Kids

Try this egg roll activity for kids and crack open a great new experience. Test the power of water -- squirt bottles or hoses -- with this fun relay.

What You'll Need:

  • Plastic Easter eggs
  • Water bottles or hoses
  • Level playing field

Each player has their own plastic Easter egg (a different color for each, just to keep things straight.) The first person in line places their egg on the ground and grabs the team hose or water bottle.

When the starter says "go," begin to move the egg down the playing field, towards the finish line, using only the stream of water from your hose or water bottle.

Once your egg crosses that line, head back to your team and pass the hose or squirter. The first team to move all their colored eggs across the line wins.

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ABOUT THE CRAFT DESIGNERS

Star Gazing Project by Maria Birmingham, Karen E. Bledsoe and Kelly Milner HallsEgg Roll Activity by Maria Birmingham, Karen E. Bledsoe and Kelly Milner Halls