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Gift Guide for the DIYer Who Has Everything

Giving a great gift can be an art form, but it's a simpler one when your giftee has a clear interest.
Giving a great gift can be an art form, but it's a simpler one when your giftee has a clear interest.
©iStockphoto.com/AVAVA

It's the age-old holiday dilemma: what to get the one who has it all. Do you go sentimental? Expensive? Gift certificate? Puppy?

Giving a great gift can be an art form, but it's a simpler one when your giftee has a clear interest. The do-it-yourselfer, whether that "doing" involves woodworking, home repairs, sewing or renovations, has a hobby you can work with.

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The gift search does get a bit more difficult when your receiver already has everything required (or desired) for the chosen task. A gift certificate to a hardware store is a sure bet, but some people prefer to get a bit more specific. So, what do you get the DIYer who has it all?

With a little thought and research, you can come up with the perfect gift. Here, a few ideas for something highly likely to please, beginning with a gift to please the toddler in us all (look, it's mine!)...

 

Personalization is an interesting trick: Put something individual on the most common of objects, and it becomes a treasure. It's as true for a hammer set as it is for a watch or robe.

Chances are, your do-it-yourselfer has interests beyond the shop. You can use that to bypass the "Oh, he/she already has one of those" problem. That could mean having a sports-team logo printed on a new toolbox, or a special symbol or phrase engraved on a shiny new top-of-the-line wrench (you may want to check the brand on your DIYer's current wrench -- that matters).

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Names and initials, of course, are great crowd-pleasers, too.

Up next, who couldn't use the gift of ideas?

Give your DIYer a year's worth of inspiration with a magazine subscription.
Give your DIYer a year's worth of inspiration with a magazine subscription.
Lifesize/Thinkstock

With the success of the thousands of magazines dedicated to every niche market imaginable, it's no secret that hobbyists love to receive some monthly inspiration through the mail. You can use that.

There's a large number of magazines out there dedicated to the DIYer. You'll find monthly specialty publications on woodworking, carpentry, kitchen design, sewing, boat projects, plumbing, mechanics, roofing, landscape design and faux finishing, for a start. Then there are the more general-purpose magazines that cover a full range of projects and resources in every issue.

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Books are excellent gifts as well. Reference books, like complete electrical or plumbing guides, or specialized ones written by industry experts, can go a long way with someone who takes pride in knowing how to do it all.

Up next, speaking of knowing how to do it all …

For a DIYer who wants a little more instruction, buy a class. It can be weekly or just a one-time workshop.
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Unless we're talking about screwing in a light bulb, doing it yourself takes a lot of know-how. While a magazine or book is great for inspiration and reference, it's a poor substitute for taking a class.

Classes on DIY topics can be weekly or just a one-time workshop, and there are some available online. For someone dedicated to his or her craft, it can be a great way to spend an hour or a day. Check out home stores, hardware stores, crafting stores, community colleges and community centers for classes on home repair, woodworking, metalworking and tons of other activities.

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Finally, for the DIYer who really, truly has it all, you might want to use this gift-giving opportunity to inspire a whole new use for some of that shop space …

If your DIYer truly has everything, consider antique tools to use or display.
If your DIYer truly has everything, consider antique tools to use or display.
Stockbyte/Thinkstock

For those deep into the tool realm, it can become about more than functionality. It can become about collecting -- and tool collecting is about antiques.

Whether it's from the Renaissance or the Industrial Revolution, an antique tool can be a wonderful thing for do-it-yourselfer to explore, display and, in some cases, use. It can turn out to be a whole new angle on the hobby -- one that brings years of joy and interest, not to mention the potential for increasing value.

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You can find antique tools at antiques shows, from dealers, and at online auction sites. Collecting is an art form, so you may want to check out the tutorial listed at Union Hill Antique Tools before making a purchase for your favorite DIYer.

In the end, keep in mind: It really is about the thought. Whether you're buying for a do-it-yourselfer or a pay-somebody-elser, stressing really belies the point of holiday generosity. And besides, most things can be re-gifted.

For more information on gifts, DIY and related topics, look over the links on the next page.

Related Articles

Sources

  • DIY Network (Nov. 11, 2010)http://www.diynetwork.com/
  • Sears: Personalized Tools (Nov. 11, 2010)http://www.mysears.com/Personalized-Tools
  • Union Hill Antique Tools (Nov. 11, 2010)http://www.tooltimer.com/beginners.htm

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