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Dress Styles

The dress style you choose may be classic, trendy or have elements of both. Chances are, the basic construction will be similar to one of the styles below:

  • A-line -- A fitted bodice that has a modest flair in the skirt, A-line wedding-dress designs are among the most popular sold today. This is a universal classic that suits almost any body type.
  • Ball gown -- This is the fairytale princess dress style you remember from Lady Diana's wedding and Grace Kelly's ceremony a few decades before. It has a long, flowing skirt and a fitted bodice. It has lots of fullness, created with petticoats or hoops.
  • Blouson -- Blouson designs are, as the name implies, blousy. They're gathered at the waist or an inch or two below.
  • Drop waist -- Sporting either a loose or fitted bodice, drop-waist gowns add styling that accentuates the area just below the waistline or the waist itself.
  • Asymmetrical -- Dresses with features like one shoulder strap or layering that creates an uneven, spatial arrangement or silhouette.
  • Empire -- Distinguished by a high waist, hitting just below the bust. The empire styling elongates the body, minimizes pear-shaped figures and can conceal a disproportionately large or small bust.
  • Mermaid -- Also called a trumpet or fishtail design, the mermaid dress hugs the body and begins to flair, usually at the knee. The flare can be modest or exaggerated. This design accentuates a woman's figure and shows particularly well on tall, athletic women.
  • Mini -- A gown with a hemline that falls at or above the knee.
  • Princess -- Created from unbroken vertical panels, this style can take a classic A-line shape or have a more exaggerated flare. It's considered a slimming design that will suit most body types.
  • Sheath -- Unconstructed, long and slim, the sheath is body-hugging and doesn't have a fitted waist.