Wedding Withdrawal: How can you cope after your big day?


How to Kick the Wedding Withdrawal Blues
Creating a photo album may help you close the book on your big day.
Creating a photo album may help you close the book on your big day.
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Tackle wedding withdrawal by first shifting your perspective. Remember, this is just the beginning! The best is yet to come. You have the entire rest of your life to create spectacular memories with your new husband. And you can start now. Here are a number of things you can do to be proactive and dig yourself out of a rut of marriage-induced melancholy:

  • Being aware of your mood or negative thoughts can be half the battle. Talk about what's wrong. Share your feelings with your husband. This is the man who has vowed to love you forever. He's your rock. Let him be that for you as you deal with wedding withdrawal.
  • Wrap up final wedding activities. Is there anything left to do that's related to your wedding? Do it! Write thank-you cards for gifts you've received. Create a wedding album, DVD or slideshow of photos from your big day that you can view with your hubby each year on your anniversary.
  • Focus on your marriage. Use this time to focus on your new husband and the commitment that you share. Spend time investing in your partner and getting used to your new roles as husband and wife.
  • Go easy on yourself. Wedding withdrawal is a common condition, and you're not alone. There's nothing wrong with you. The emotions you're feeling will pass. If they don't, see a professional to make sure the wedding-related depression you're experiencing isn't something more serious.

No matter how blue you're feeling, chances are that within a few weeks or months you'll feel like your old self again. So cuddle up with your hubby and focus on the loving relationship the two of you share. After all, your wedding was only the beginning of the rest of your married life!