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10 Things Your Wedding Planner Doesn't Want You to Know


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"Wedding Planner" Isn't an All-inclusive Term
Read that contract so you know exactly what services your planner is providing.
Read that contract so you know exactly what services your planner is providing.
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Wedding planners' roles range from part-time assistants to full-time nuptial consultants. Avoid confusion by making sure you're clear on what your planner's responsibilities are from the get-go.

A full-service coordinator is one who handles all of the details up to and including the wedding, whereas a wedding day director simply runs the show the day of the event. Often, wedding venues automatically include a reception director service in the rental price, so hiring an independent consultant might not be necessary at all.

The event director role is the more cost-effective option for brides who enjoy the planning process but don't want to be stressed on the big day. Typically, one can expect to fork over from $500 to $3,500 for this service, whereas a full-service planner can run you anywhere from $1,700 to $20,000, according to the experts at Sweet Dreams Weddings and Events.

Brides who just need a creative muse of sorts might do well to hire an event designer who specializes in event style and theme development.