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5 Surprising Scents Used in Body Fragrances


Ambergris, historically (and currently, on the gray market) a highly valuable fragrance ingredient, forms in the intestinal tract of whales, the result of ingesting indigestible animal parts. The stinky ball exits from the rear, at which point it begins its years-long, salt-water-fueled transformation into a substance that runs roughly one-third to two-thirds the price of gold.
Ambergris, historically (and currently, on the gray market) a highly valuable fragrance ingredient, forms in the intestinal tract of whales, the result of ingesting indigestible animal parts. The stinky ball exits from the rear, at which point it begins its years-long, salt-water-fueled transformation into a substance that runs roughly one-third to two-thirds the price of gold.
Photo courtesy Flickr | Peter Kaminski

A waft of flowers is typical. Cedar, citrus and spices, too, characterize plenty of perfumes, body sprays and colognes. Fruit cake, margaritas and roast beef? Somewhat less commonplace.

While most fragrances lean toward the traditional, there are some rather unique scents out there that challenge the perfume paradigm. Perhaps fruit cake makes sense at Christmas time if you're really in the spirit of the season, but others boggle the mind: Who would want to walk around smelling like deli meat or alcohol? (Wouldn't the latter make coworkers wonder?)

Apparently, enough people to create a market for some meaty, sweet or just plain strange body fragrances. Here, five scent categories you just don't see every day, beginning with one you should probably avoid if you're on a diet ...