5 Strategies for Dealing with Cyberbullying


5
Monitor Electronic Use

To deal with cyberbullying, you have to know whether or not it's occurring. It's important that your teens trust you and are willing to come to you if there's an issue. When they do, you'll want to strike a balance between overreacting and under-reacting when you hear the news.

But if your adolescents aren't the most forthcoming about their online activities, and you suspect something is up, you may need to do some legwork to find out whether there's an issue, say by purchasing some monitoring software. To protect your children from cyberbullies, it's important to keep tabs on what technologies they're using, how much they're using them and with whom they're using them.

When it comes to Facebook, it's a good idea to have your kids "friend" you so you can see what they're posting and what other people are posting about them. If you can, ask them for some of their passwords, too, so you can keep an eye on their online communications like IMs and e-mails. Set limits on how much they can use the Internet and other electronic devices -- studies have shown the more time teens spend online, the more likely they are to fall victim to cyberbullying.