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5 Things to Expect After Leaving the NICU


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The Green-eyed Monster Might Be a Problem
Matthew Hirsh, who was born at just 28 weeks, is just one face on the March of Dimes tour at New York University Medical Center during Prematurity Awareness Month.
Matthew Hirsh, who was born at just 28 weeks, is just one face on the March of Dimes tour at New York University Medical Center during Prematurity Awareness Month.
DCL

When you come home from the NICU, you'll be spending a lot of time with your baby. Of course, it's perfectly normal for a mother and her newborn to bond, but preemies need more care than regular infants. If you have other children, it's only natural that they might be jealous of their new, attention-stealing sibling. However, there are ways to circumvent -- or, at the very least, minimize -- older children's envious emotions.

The best way to put their worried little minds at ease is to explain that it's only a temporary situation. They'll also feel better if you find ways to include them that make them feel important. Make them active contributors in caring for their new sibling. Depending on their ages and the kind of responsibility they can handle, let them help you feed, bathe and change the baby. They'll feel good about helping, and you'll be thankful for the assistance.


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