How to Host a Neighborhood Meet and Greet


Hosting a neighborhood meet and greet can be just as much about having fun as it is about meeting your neighbors.
Hosting a neighborhood meet and greet can be just as much about having fun as it is about meeting your neighbors.
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Living in a neighborhood can be more about strategic maneuvers to "get inside and hide" rather than to "meet and greet" our neighbors. Hanging out in the front yard and getting neighborly takes time that most of us never seem to have enough of; we'd rather be with family or have a few precious moments alone. But most of us can find time for a party or two.

Hosting a meet and greet is one way to get all of the introductions among neighbors into one social function while including the family and setting some boundaries on the amount of time involved. A meet and greet can take place on your block, in backyards, at a community center, park or pool, or at a local hall. There are no rules to how, where and when it happens, but there is one must do for hosts: Everyone in the neighborhood gets an invitation.

What kind of super-party-planning men and women have the time on their hands to plan such a thing? Virtually none, and that's why the meeting and greeting usually gets started in the planning stages, long before the party itself.

Getting to socialize and network with your neighbors can begin months before you're all together and celebrating, and whether you're one to run errands and make phone calls or to recruit and organize, hosting a party for dozens or even hundreds isn't as hard as it sounds as long as you do it at the neighborhood level.