When good juice goes bad, nobody wants to drink it, but you can still change the color.

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When Good Juice Goes Bad

When good juice goes bad, nobody wants to drink it. But your kids can trick an audience into thinking that they can turn good juice into bad juice in the blink of an eye. Make sure your kids wear goggles and rubber gloves when working with ammonia to avoid skin contact. If ammonia gets on their skin, wash immediately with lots of water. Clean glasses well after use. Don't let anybody drink from the glasses until they have been cleaned well with soap and lots of water! Never eat or drink the chemistry experiments!

What You'll Need:
  • 3 glasses
  • Goggles
  • Rubber gloves
  • Measuring spoons and cups
  • Vinegar
  • Ammonia
  • Water
  • Red grape juice
How to Create When Good Juice Goes Bad:

Step 1: Have your children set up the glasses. Ask them to put on the goggles and rubber gloves.

Step 2: Have your kids add 1/2 teaspoon vinegar to the third glass, 1/8 teaspoon ammonia to the second glass, and 1/3 cup water to the first glass. Have them also add one teaspoon red grape juice to this glass.

Step 3: Tell your kids to not let the audience know there is anything in glasses two or three. Have them hold up the first glass and say, "We start with juice." They should pour the liquid from the first glass into glass two. The solution will become green. Have them say, "Good juice has now gone bad."

Step 4: Have your children ask the audience to hope real hard that the bad juice will become good juice again. Your kids should pour the liquid from glass two to glass three. The solution turns pale red again! Have your children announce that the good juice has returned. Grape juice changes color when it is combined with an alkaline substance. The solution is pink in glass one because the pH of water is close to neutral. When poured into glass two, it turns green because the ammonia creates an alkaline solution. When poured into glass three, the acidic vinegar neutralizes the alkaline solution, and the solution becomes pink again.

Keep reading science projects for kids: chemical reactions to learn what ingredient your kids will need to keep vinegar and oil mixed together.

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